The 2010 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 was scheduled for a retooling under the hood this year with a turbodiesel V8 but those plans were dashed by GMs poor bottom line in the past year. As it stands, this top-selling pickup comes in a standard version that feature one of the following motors: 4.3 liter V6 at 195 horsepower, 4.8 liter V8 at 315 horsepower, 5.3 liter V8 at 315 horsepower, or a 6.2 liter V8 at 403 horsepower. The hybrid version, however, has only one option  the 6.0 liter V8 paired with its electric counterpart for a total of 332 horsepower. Depending on the demands of the driver, the combustion engine can run alone, the electric engine can run alone, or they can run in tandem.

Because the electric engine feeds off the alternator of the V8, it never requires external charging like all-electric cars. The only downside to the hybrid Silverado 1500 is an extremely reduced towing capacity. While the standard 2010 Silverado 1500 can pull up to 10,700 pounds, the hybrid can only handle 6,100 pounds. The bonus for using the hybrid is a greatly increased fuel economy rating. The standard Silverado 1500 already features the best fuel economy for a full-size American pick-up at 15 mpg in the city and 22 mpg on the highway. The hybrid beats even that with 21 mpg city and 22 mpg highway. Because the electric engine runs mostly at lower speeds, the highway fuel economy is unchanged. The Active Fuel Management of the V8 engine also helps to save gas by allowing it to run in a 4-cylinder mode at mid speeds while the electric can do it all alone at up to 30 mph. This is all made possible by the unique Electrically Variable Transmission system of the 2010 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Hybrid.

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